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Mariah Brown was born in the Upper Bogue, Eleuthera, Bahamas in 1851 and immigrated to the United States in 1880. Brown lived in Key West with her three daughters and worked as a laundress. By 1889, Brown had moved to Coconut Grove to work in the Peacock Inn owned by one of Coconut Grove founders, Charles Peacock. Though Brown and her daughters initially lived at the Peacock Inn, she soon bought land to build her own home. Located on Evangelist Street (now Charles Avenue) and within walking distance from the Peacock Inn, Brown purchased the plot for $50 from local landowner Joseph Frow. Brown and her family were among the first black families to settle in Coconut Grove, and her house, constructed in 1890, was the first built on Evangelist Street. Brown’s significance to the African-Bahamian community lasted well beyond her death in 1910. Her house along with those of other black landowners, such as E.W.F. Stirrup, became the heart of the African-Bahamian community in Coconut Grove. African-Bahamians were one of the earliest immigrant groups to arrive in South Florida, and the community in Coconut Grove is one of the oldest black communities in Dade County. #coconutgrove #miami #miamidade #dadecounty #historyindade #305 #mariahbrownhouse #bahamas #tbt #esco_mia

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•Georgette’s Tea Room• Owned by Georgette Scott Campbell, the tea room in Brownsub (also known as Brownsville) was a swank setting for black organizations and its offered black entertainers a comfortable, secluded retreat from the overcrowding in Overtown. Following Miami’s incorporation in 1896, restrictive land deeds confined most of Dade County black populations to “Colored Town”, a then segregated quarter on the northwest section of Downtown Miami, now known as Overtown. During the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, Overtown was a hub for black entertainment featuring stars such as Marion Anderson, Bessie Smith, Nat “King” Cole and Billie Holiday at local clubs and theaters in the black community. After World War II, many black entertainers became popular on Miami Beach, but because of segregationist policies they were not allowed to stay in the hotels on the beach. There were several Overtown hotels, owned and operated by blacks, but Georgette’s Tea Rooms provided a getaway from the bustle of Downtown. Campbell first came to Miami in 1917 from her birthplace, Waycross, Georgia. She and her sister Willie owned and operated a restaurant, the Royal Cafe, in Overtown. In 1934 she moved to New York City. She opened a tea room in Harlem and became a well known and popular hostess there. In 1940, she moved back to Miami and bought three lots in Brown’s subdivision. The thirteen-room house, located at 2540 N.W. 51st Street, was built according to her plans, with the architecture in the Streamline Modern Style and the furnishings in the lavish, English Tudor style. Famous guests such as the Ink Spots, Billie Holiday and Nat “King” Cole once ate and slept at Georgette’s Tea Room. The Black Archives History & Research Foundation of South FL, Inc. #miami #brownsville #brownsub #overtown #libertycity #miamidade #dadecounty #dade #305 #georgettestearoom #billieholiday #ellafitzgerald #natkingcole #louisarmstrong #jazz #blues #historyindade #tbt #esco_mia

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