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bryan white

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A snapshot of Coco-dotty, wanting to know if you think this is her good side... and just because @tarahharlin was asking after her! 👋🐔

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We discovered some garlic while readying an overgrown garden bed for fall planting. It was a whole head that had started to sprout, which meant that the single clove we had planted in that spot over a season ago, had formed an entire head of garlic, that then began the cycle again, since it wasn’t ever harvested. Even though the cloves were still in their same location—gathered together in a head—the membranes that become the papery white bits that you break apart had all disintegrated, and had begun to send up their first initial greens and roots. We separated all of these and replanted them in this year’s allium bed—a nice head start to next spring’s garlic crop!

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That look you give when someone insists on taking photos while you’re just trying to enjoy your morning yogurt in peace. Happy #fluffybuttfriday, peeps!

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Repost from @miromadethis: Quinces, from our tree. I picked them a bit early this year, which was only realized when I began to scrub the fuzzy protective layer off their skins, and could see that some were still a bit green, instead of a deep yellow. So now they are spread in a single layer, on linen towel-covered trays, slowly ripening, for however long that takes. When they are ready, and their fragrance is unmistakable, they’ll be turned into the first batch of this year’s supply of membrillo. Like all good things worth waiting for, they can not be rushed, their process can’t be hastened.

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Quinces ripening on the tree.

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When you try to take a group photo of the gang, but someone always insists on being a prima donna, or rather, a “prima dotta” . (That’s Winnie-dotty front and center)!

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First of the Jerusalem artichokes to begin blooming in the back forty. We’re generally not the sort who plant flowers for the sake of flowers—although we always have plans to plant sunflowers. Usually any flowers that end up flourishing on the property are a by product of food production—blossoms that turn into fruit—or a byproduct of things going to seed—vegetables beyond their prime that bloom and then flower and seed. But we are always happy to let those things cycle through—as they become valuable fodder to encourage pollinators and also provide color and beauty in the garden and in the field.

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Biscotti earlier this morning, in the nest box, looking pensive...

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Basil from the garden, destined as pesto for dinner!

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A quick snapshot of the shishito peppers that are just starting up again. They’ll get bigger and bigger as the weather cools. And behind every photo, there are always critics and stylists ready to lend a helping hand, er, wing!

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The Jerusalem artichokes in the back forty are getting ready to flower, as the heat of the summer is finally beginning to subside (temperatures below 100°F this week)! It’s a perennial, and flourishes here in our climate—it was cultivated by Native Americans for its tuber, before the arrival of Europeans, so it has a long history in this land. This root crop layer, within the seven layers of our Food forest, produces a bright yellow flower, similar to a sunflower, to which it is related. The bright pop of color that it provides against the backdrop of all the greenery is a welcome indicator of the cooler months to come.

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Weekly pickup of kitchen scraps from @restaurantprogressphx, one of our favorite local restaurants, destined for the compost.

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Gathering perennial oregano at its peak, to dry and store for the colder months ahead. We pick it in the smallest of batches, and spread them out on trays—the air here is dry enough that as long as everything has enough airflow, there’s no need to hang them, use screens, or a dehydrator or oven as is typically recommended. Then we store them stems and all, and just strip them and crumble them as needed when adding to a recipe.

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A video from last month, during monsoon season—caught a Palo Verde Beetle (Derobrachus hovorei). This isn’t even as big as they can get—they grow to be up to 3 1/2” long. They spend most of their lives as grubs, and eat the roots of trees, in particular the Palo Verde, which is why they’re named after them. The adults emerge for a month during monsoon season to mate—even though they don’t attack humans, it’s still very startling to see the enormous flying insects around.

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The look on Teeny-Tiny-Moka-Dotty’s face when we told her that there’s such a thing as Fluffy Butt Friday! Happy Friday, peeps!

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Mini-dotty foraging in the back forty—nibbling on Bermuda grass seed heads!

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Starting seeds for fall planting! These are Tuscan Kale. We like to succession plant, so small quantities of the things we want to eat this fall and winter will be started over the next few months... We also always overseed our starts—it makes it easier to transplant things with enough roots to hold onto the soil , and then we thin them out once they are planted into the garden and have a chance to acclimate. The thinning get used in salads, or as treats for the chickens.

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Seed saving. Shishito peppers. Whenever we don’t pick the peppers fast enough to harvest, we let them mature to red on the plants, pick them and let them dry, then store them. Next year, we’ll just crumble the whole peppers to plant as seeds—there’s no need to pick the seeds out, and it’s an admittedly satisfying crunch and crumble come spring.

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