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Transit Bricks

Lego + transit history. 🚋🚎🚂 Toronto's #1 time-traveling historian is on a mission to remind our City of its public transit history!

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Today the Transit Bricks display was set up behind @rapidotrainsinc's vintage "Fishbowl" bus during the @wheelsonthedanforth event. The Lego C.L.R.V. streetcar was powered up and driving around the table. Thanks to everyone who came out!

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Trevor is prepping his Lego buses and streetcars for the @wheelsonthedanforth car show tomorrow. The Transit Bricks display will be set up between 2 full sized vintage buses. Saturday Aug. 18th 11am to 11pm by Victoria Park Subway Station on Danforth Ave.

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#Lego replicas of two 1920s Toronto Transportation Commission buses in front of Annette Street Public School. These "motor coaches" were built by the 5th Ave. Coach company and were the first generation of T.T.C. buses in Toronto. They operated on Annette Street from the intersection of Dundas St. W. and Humberside Ave. to Runnymede Road between 1921 and 1925. Bus service was removed from this part of Annette Street until 1947, when trolley buses were introduced. Today the school is serviced by the 26 Dupont bus.

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Here is a behind-the-scenes look at the Transit Bricks workshop. The 1899 streetcar was being tested to see if it could tow the larger Canadian Light Rail Vehicle around. It can!

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3 generations of Toronto's bendable streetcars at the intersection of Roncesvalles Ave, Queen Street W., King Street W., and the Queensway. In the 1890s the Toronto Railway Company introduced electric streetcars, which pulled the old @torontostreetrailway horsecars as a trailers. In 1988 the Toronto Transit Commission introduced Articulated Light Rail Vehicles. The rear section of the "bendy streetcars" is pulled around like a trailer, but allows passengers to walk from one end to the other. Today the new "Flexity Outlook" Light Rail Vehicles are slowly replacing the older C.R.L.V.s and A.L.R.Vs. Lego models built by Transit Historian Trevor.

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3 Lego transit enthusiasts are in awe of this massive steam locomotive from 1942. It was built by the Motreal Locomotive Works and its currently on display out front of the Canada Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa. #scitechbrik

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#Throwback to when Toronto's Lego transit creators Trevor Parkins-Sciberras and Aaron Chapman collaborated on a photoshoot with their T.T.C. subway models. Trevor's model is of a vintage T.T.C. Gloucester subway car from 1954. The last of the red G trains retired from Toronto in 1990. You can find a full sized one on display at the Halton County Radial Railway. Aaron's model is of a modern Toronto Rocket subway, first introduced in 2011. Stay tuned for more collaborations!

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#Repost of Toronto Transit Commission Subway Operator Aaron Chapman's stop-animation video, "Perspective." His video features his Lego replica of a modern "Toronto Rocket" subway train. Check him out @legovader217.

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For the first time ever, you can see Toronto's forgotten horse-drawn streetcar in action. This "horsecar" has been replicated in Lego by Transit Historian Trevor, and is based on the vehicles operated by the @torontostreetrailway from 1861 to 1891. Even though a full sized Toronto horsecar still exists (its hidden in Ottawa), no film footage of it in motion has ever been seen! Stay tuned to Transit Bricks for more stop animation videos of Lego public transit vehicles!

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On Saturday August 18th 2018 the Transit Bricks pop-up Lego museum will be at @wheelsonthedanforth 2018 car show. The event is on Danforth Ave by Danforth Road, south east of Victoria Park Subway Station. 11am to 11pm. Transit Historian Trevor and his display of Lego buses and streetcars will be set up next to @rapidotrainsinc's refurbished GM "Fishbowl" Newlook bus.

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3 T.T.C. buses headed southbound on Dundas Street West towards Glenlake Ave. The Lego double-decker bus is based on the T.T.C.'s 1st bus from 1921 which began operations in the West Toronto Junction. The open upper deck proved to be unpopular in Canadian weather, and the bus was replaced by single-deckers. Bus #1 is currently hidden in storage at the Canada Science and Technology Museum in Ottawa. Today there are Orion 7 buses operating on the 40 Junction route from Dundas West Station to the Runnymede Loop.

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Toronto's air-conditioned streetcars on Dundas Street West: then and now. The T.T.C.'s "Flexity Outlook" L.R.V. #4447 meets Transit Historian Trevor's Lego replica of T.R.Co. open streetcar #327 and its trailer #11. In 1893 the 1st electric streetcars were ran on Dundas Street West from Bloor Street to Church Street and were operated by the Toronto Railway Company. That year the TRCo introduced 20 electric open-sided streetcars like #327, for summer use. The motorized cars would pull the older horse-drawn opencars around as trailers, which were built in the 1880s for the @torontostreetrailway. The Motorman drove the streetcar, while 2 Conductors collected fares from passengers riding the pair of coupled cars. Today the Toronto Transit Commission operates Light Rail Vehicles on the 505 Dundas Route. The full sized #327 is at the Halton County Radial Railway while trailer #11 is at The @shorelinetrolleyinsta Museum.

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Lego replica of Toronto Transit Commission "Canadian Light Rail Vehicle" #4000 on Dundas Street heading west from Yonge Street. Streetcars were originally put into service on Dundas Street in 1893 by the Toronto Railway Company. The west and east ends of Dundas were serviced by different streetcar routes until 1966 when they were merged. Today the "505 Dundas" streetcars have been temporarily moved off the route and onto the "504 King" route to help with overcrowding. Buses have replaced the 505 streetcars for at least a year.

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This photo was 3 years in the making. Those who have been following Trevor's journey since 2015 know that his interest in history began with Toronto's forgotten horse-drawn streetcars. He created his first Lego horsecar when he discovered that there was a full sized one still in existence. After 3 years of eagerly waiting, Trevor finally got to tour the museum storage facility in Ottawa where Toronto's horsecar #16 is being preserved. His goal is to bring this forgotten relic back to our city and inspire a greater appreciation for our modern transit system. Check out @torontotransitmuseum for more photos of the surviving TTC relics!

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A #Lego horse-drawn omnibus was touring @exporail_qc_canada to see all the vintage trains there. On display in the main entrance was a replica of a Dorchester 0-2-0 type steam locomotive from 1836.

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Transit Historian Trevor's #Lego replica of a @torontostreetrailway omnibus next to the wheel of a real omnibus at @exporail_qc_canada. These horse-drawn buses were operated in Toronto from 1850 to 1891, and were a common form of transportation around the world. It wasn't until 1921 that the TTC introduced motorized buses to Toronto. One of the full sized "Toronto Railway" omnibuses is currently hidden in storage at the Canada @scitechmuseum.

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#Lego transit enthusiasts checking out "Montreal Street Railway" electric streetcar #274 at @exporail_qc_canada. It was built in 1892 by the Newburyport Car Manufacturing Company and was a part of the first generation of electric streetcars in Montreal. It was converted into a salt car in 1912 and retired in 1947. In 1950 it was saved by the Canadian Railroad Historical Association, and was the first vehicle acquired for the Exporail collection.

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A #Lego train engineer shows visitors the Dominion of Canada locomotive currently on display at @exporail_qc_canada. The steam locomotive was built in Doncaster works in May of 1937. It was retired in 1965, and aquired by Exporail in 1965. In 2012 the locomotive was sent back to the UK for cosmetic restoration and a temporary display. In 2014 it returned to the museum in Canada and was put back on display.

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